On automata and statues:

‘Our imaginary identification with so alien a creature as a moving statue or an automaton can be profoundly satisfying, partly because that identification may spare us diverse anxieties about our place in the world, in our own bodies, about the proper location of the human. The freedom entailed by that identification lies not just in the idea of a turn against the blockage or oblivious figured by the stone, but in the fact that the living statues, for all its motion, yet tends to remain a statue, untroubled and unselfconscious (or at least we hope it does). Yet if the living statues does not disappoint us by becoming all too human (as Shaw’s Eliza Doolittle disappoints her “creator”), the fiction of animation is also likely to remind us of how alien and how disruptive of what we think of as the human are our vital energies, how catastrophic, petrifying, or mechanistic a form the entry into life can assume. Indeed, it suggest the ways in which the fantasy of the animated statue may constitute an implicit critique of our optimistic pictures of human desire, and of our wish that desire and the human could peacefully occupy the same space. The living statue may remind us that there is never any fixed space between.’

‘…Placing the question about the consciousness of stones thus in relation to the automaton fantasy, it starts to seem as if the desire to invite the inanimate into the space of the human conceals or mirrors a desire to push the human into a space of the inanimate. The face of objects granted a more than ordinary life becomes the face of Medusa.’

From The Dream of the Moving Statue by Kenneth Gross

Last day to download THE PRE-PROGRAMMING for free in our St. Patrick’s WEEK giveaway:

Erichthonius isn’t the only thing that Hephaestus caused. Autochthonous, Automaton. Same difference.

Volume 1. | Volume. 2 

 

Who needs a Leprechaun when these Automata have the Midas touch:

Both of these ebooks are free right now. See below:

| Volume 2. |

| Volume 1. |

Download links for free copies of the Circo del Herrero series.

The synopsis for our third mythpunk novel THE LATHING:

The Lathing (Vol. 3 of the Circo del Herrero Series) Synopsis:

[Smack dab in the Bible Belt’s buckle, Vulcan arranges His pagan pieces. The tribal casinos are nothing but referential backdrop for His latest hustle. The gods have all paid to play. They’ve offered up parts of themselves to help make “The Game”—some more than others—but their chimeric incarnations are not where they place their bets. It is the human players they gamble on. The gods know the game is rigged but that’s half the fun, figuring out just what Vulcan has pre-programmed— how it works—how they, too, might cheat.

And like the gods, some Automata think they’ve found the secret mechanism that makes it all tick. Other Automata, however, are not so sure. They choose opposing humans—humans with flaws and sins so much like their own. Those they pick show less about the beings they’ve become than the ghosts that still haunt and possess them…

THE LATHING is the final attestation of the Narrator and the Editor—the final volume in the CIRCO DEL HERRERO series. In it, once-gods may find forgiveness and be made whole again if they pick the winning team. Automata may find a self that is worth knowing and saving. But the humans, well, they were just lucky the game found them before Death did. They’ll live just a little while longer before finding something truly worth dying for. At the end of it all is glory and godhood and possibly a cat.]

Saint Patrick’s Day? More like Saint Patrick’s WEEK. Both our ebooks are free right now.

You might already know that THE AUTOMATION, Vol. 1 of the Circo del Herrero Series is already permafree on the Internet Archive, but did you know that our Vol. 2 is also free right now until 19th? Download it here. 

 

Vulcan’s lucky charms.

What people are saying on Goodreads:

“There are interesting explorations of freedom, and what this means – do we have choice at all, or are we all pre-programmed robots destined to live out what the gods decide for us?” Reviewer

 

“This novel is dark, unpredictable, and innovative, a unique gem for fans of Urban Fantasy and Greco-Roman mythology who appreciate a little sensationalism.” Reviewer

 

“…there is probably the most drastic left-turn that I have ever seen a series take, and I still don’t know quite what to make of it.” Reviewer