Quotes from: Women and Other Monsters by Jess Zimmerman

“Justice is not severed in The Eumenides, either. The trial is a nightmare, really. Orestes and Apollo argue that mothers aren’t really the parents of their children, just receptacles for a father’s seed. This convinces only some people, and the jury votes six to six. Then, Athena, casting the deciding vote, says flat out she only really cares about men, which means she considers Clytemnestra killing Agamemnon a worse offense than Orestes killing Clytemnestra. I like Robert Lowell’s translation because it doesn’t mince words: “I killed Clytemnestra. Why should I lie?” says Orestes. “The father not the mother is the parent,” says Apollo, who adds that the mother is only “a borrower, a nurse.” “I owe no loyalty to women. / In all things…I am a friend to man,” says Athena. “It can’t mean much if a woman, who has killed her husband is killed.” Orestes, in other words, is acquitted explicitly on the strength of disdain for women. It doesn’t matter if your reasons are good when you control the law.

Part of the exhaustion of being a monster, part of what keeps you at home in your cave, is knowing that it’s a foregone conclusion: Everything you create will be attacked and destroyed. Everything will exist for being attacked and destroyed, and for heroes to be made in the destroying of it. All your monstrous progeny, so painfully birthed: they will never come to anything but cannon fodder. It is so hard to live beyond boundaries when you know the consequences. Who can bring children into the world knowing they’re fated to be killed? Who wants to go through the pain of birth only to roll right into the pain of grief?”

BookTuber Tuesday: 40: Ready Player One – Thom Dunn – Fuckbois of Literature with Emily Edwards

“I Love Spoilers.”

They did not talk about how Facebook Oculus employees were encouraged to read this book or the fact that it is shaping fb’s Metaverse, but I liked the point on male easter egg vigilance paralleled to the female obsession with true crime and their belief in hypervigilance (16:00 time stamp is where the convo gets really good, ~18:00 is the comparison mark).

Conserving Calder’s Circus

GABBLER RECOMMENDS: Alexander Calder performs his “Circus” | Whitney Museum of American Art

Alexander Calder shows us what all the amazing wire models that make up his miniature circus can do in this film by Jean Painleve from 1955. Calder is famous for his colorful mobiles, but Cirque Calder is one of his incredible lesser-known works from 1931.

[Via]

BookTuber Tuesday: The WORST Books I Read in 2021 👎 Unnecessary sequels, girlboss stories, and of course… faerie D