GABBLER RECOMMENDS: Years and Years TV show

 

“The juxtaposition of the epic and mundane is the point. This is a broad-strokes diagnosis of a species in existential crisis. It’s meant as a warning about what’s happening in the present moment. And it is seemingly unconcerned about timelessness, because at the rate we’re going, we won’t be able to look back on anything, since we’ll be too busy scrounging for survival in the wasteland. That every anguished or panicked moment seems to vanish mere instants after registering on your brainpan is part of the design. It’s the miniseries as Snapchat message. The tl;dr version is that the world is stuffed, as the Brits would put it, if we don’t face facts and start cleaning up the mess we’ve made.”  [Via]

This is not like Black Mirror. Though you may think the show will villainize technology and futurisms as they appear, they are redeemed throughout and at the end. For example, in the first episode, you get a young girl hiding behind snapchat-like filter holograms, declaring that she is “trans” yet meaning she is transhuman. Her experience turns out to be somewhat of a warning and encouragement in the series. No spoilers, but her transition has just as many horrific stepping stones as well as joyful ones. In the last episode, the matriarch of the family goes on a rant involving the self-checkouts at the grocery stores and you start to roll your eyes, but then the monologue actually recognizes itself and makes a point. And like the futuristic techy bits, the characters themselves all have their moral flaws at times, only to be given redemption — or what one might call “multidimensionalness.”

It’s an interesting show that is sticking with me, especially with it’s delivery of such an expansive timeline. The use of loudness when the family experiences societal pressures or sped-up time was quite effective at producing anxiety in me. The parallels on issues migrants are experiencing now with ICE in the U.S. brought me to tears.

Perhaps a little melodramatic or glossed-over storyline-wise, it was still a wonderful “warning and encouragement” for how badly we can keep fucking up as well as step the fuck up.

See also:

What we talk about when we talk about post-apocalyptic stories. 

The Anti-Natalist and Anti-Colonial Messages in The Girl With All The Gifts (The Fanzine)

 

GABBLER RECOMMENDS: Los Espookys on HBO

“It feels reductive to call Los Espookys magical realism, both because it’s so much funnier than that term would normally imply, and because essentially every project that somehow involves Latin America gets dubbed “magical realism” at one point or another, whether the moniker fits or not.

But what’s so rewarding about this deeply weird little show — which HBO airs at 11 pm on Fridays, somehow the ideal timeslot for it — is how it all but forces you to pay closer attention to what could seem tossed-off or silly. You never know what might happen, a key tenet of magical realism.” [Via]

GABBLER RECOMMENDS: ‘Reading the Edited Version of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray Somehow Made Me More Queer’ by Emily Asher-Perrin

And that’s important, because a sizable part of being queer is exactly this. It’s searching for yourself in words and music and theatre and often coming back empty because the world keeps telling you that they can’t (won’t) see what you see. That thing you want isn’t there, or it’s fan service, or it’s too much too fast. Things may be changing more rapidly than ever now, but that veil of persistent societal gaslighting persists. Trying to convince people is exhausting. Enjoying yourself in spite of everything can also be exhausting. Looking for evidence when you’re pretty sure that act alone makes you queer (and you don’t know that you’re ready to face up to that) is certainly exhausting.

[Via]

Hashtags as annotations in books:

When reading Michelle Murphy’s chapter called “Against Population, Towards Alterlife” in Making Kin, Not Population, I (Gabbler) found Murphy’s particular use of hashtags inserted into the text to be fitting little asides — invitations to explore “notes” later online; annotations even the reader could contribute to. Footnotes and endnotes do not allow for such dialog or collaborative annotating. Hashtags are brilliant:

Aspiring towards decolonizing and queer alter-worlds, reproduction might be better rethought as politics of redistributing relations, possibilities and futures. #RedistributionsNotReproductions. Making redistributed relations is an extensive, ongoing endeavor, looped with imperfections, messiness, returns and futurities. I am against population and for a politics of differently distributed futures. #DifferentFutures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See also:
ON INTERSTELLAR: YOU KNOW WHO ELSE WANTED TO EXPLORE WITH THE INTENT OF INHABITING NEW LAND AND USING ITS RESOURCES? CONQUISTADORS.

WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT POST-APOCALYPTIC STORIES; WHEN THE APOCALYPSE IS SOLVED THROUGH NATALIST TROPES 

BLA THOUGHT OF THE DAY: WHAT IF ELON MUSK’S ‘RIP HARAMBE’ WAS JUST AN ATTEMPT TO GET DONNA HARAWAY TO NOTICE HIS GIRLFRIEND GRIMES? 

BOOKTUBER TUESDAY – ‘DECOLONIAL SEX AND RELATIONS FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE WORLD – DR. KIM TALLBEAR’

GABBLER RECOMMENDS: 73 Questions With Phoebe Waller-Bridge | Vogue